Mad Dog Materials was pleased to welcome pipeline construction experts from all over the country to our headquarters in Mount Sterling, Ohio, in preparation for the upcoming Nexus Pipeline project. Some of these gentlemen came from relatively close, within Ohio, while some came from as far away as Monroe, LA (they put on a brave face and dealt with the continuing cold weather).

The goal for this meeting was simple: learning how to use Mad Dog Foam Bridges and the Mad Dog App in the field for drain tile repairs.

Let’s make one thing clear: These guys already a thing or two (or three) about drain tile, and what you can expect to find when working in the field on a pipeline project such as Nexus. That said, the technology that Mad Dog Materials has introduced to the field is such a shift from conventional drain tile repair methods, a primer was worthwhile.

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First, obviously, are the Mad Dog Foam Bridges themselves. We used a mock pipeline setup in the warehouse to demonstrate how the bridge fits firmly atop the pipeline, creating a more simple and reliable bridge for drain tile repairs.

Our guests appreciated the performance benefits, of course, but the safety implications of Mad Dog Foam Bridges are what really caught their attention during this segment. After one places a Mad Dog Foam Bridge, they can backfill all the way up to the top of the bridge, at which point the repair can be made. The major difference here is that conventional sandbag bridges require workers to be in the trench, manually stacking the bags. Trenches can be as deep as 12 ft., which places workers in potentially hazardous situations, because they cannot see out of the trench. Mad Dog Foam Bridges, however, don’t require anyone to enter the trench until it has been almost completely buried. This means the trench is only 3 ft. deep, a much safer scenario for workers.

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The Mad Dog App was a more revolutionary concept for our guests, although most understood the logic completely.

The app is just a more efficient way of doing what they have already been doing for years: keeping track of data from the field. In the past, this meant writing all the details in a notebook, and then logging them on a computer at the end of the day. This leaves room for human error—from forgetting to note an important piece of information during a repair, to outright forgetting to log the information later.

The Mad Dog App allows users to log this information on the go, ensuring that it all gets collected and stored in a timely manner. One of the app’s features that was well received was its GPS capabilities. By simply tapping within the location field on the app, the phone generates accurate GPS coordinates. Our guests understand the importance of this information, especially when it comes to revisiting repairs later on down the road.

After a brief instructional period inside the office, the whole gang headed outside to do some live examples on flags we had planted in the field out back.

Everyone was satisfied and eager to start Spring work on the Nexus Pipeline (which began on March 12), but there was still one important task to undergo at the meeting…lunch. Mad Dog’s products were well received by all, but beating local barbecue is tough!

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